Liturgies

Our inclusive language liturgies generally set the structure and theme of Sunday morning worship. Since announcements are an integral part of our life together, we offer some guidelines for those who make announcements towards the end of  worship.

2020 Recomittment Liturgy: The Mind of Christ in Us

 click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Recommitment Liturgy






ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it…all of it is completely worth it.”

Nadia Bolz-Weber, Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People, p. 172

2020 Summer Liturgy: Hearing Stories Again for the First Time

click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Summer Liturgy

 

Top, Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, 1495-98. Bottom, doctors at a hospital in Paris performing a tableau vivant of the painting. Top, Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, 1495-98. Bottom, doctors at a hospital in Paris performing a tableau vivant of the painting. ISNI – InterSyndicale Nationale des Internes/Facebook

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

The basic fact is that Christianity as it was born in the mind of this Jewish teacher and thinker appears as a technique of survival for the oppressed. That it became, through the intervening years, a religion of the powerful and the dominant, used sometimes as an instrument of oppression, must not tempt us into believing that it was thus in the mind and life of Jesus. … Wherever his spirit appears, the oppressed gather fresh courage; for he announced the good news that fear, hypocrisy, and hatred, the three hounds of hell that track the trail of the disinherited, need have no dominion over them.

Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited, p 29

 

2020 Trinity Liturgy: Finding Comfort

click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Trinity Liturgy

Banner with image of cross, compass rose, and the Seekers plant

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

As the years pass, I am coming more and more to understand that it is the common, everyday blessings of our common everyday lives for which we should be particularly grateful. They are the things that fill our lives with comfort and our hearts with gladness – just the pure air to breathe and the strength to breath it; just warmth and shelter and home folks; just plain food that gives us strength; the bright sunshine on a cold day; and a cool breeze when the day is warm.

Laura Ingalls Wilder, Writings to Young Women from Laura Ingalls Wilder: On Wisdom and Virtues, p 66

2020 Easter: Witnesses to Hope

click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Easter Liturgy

Icon of the Resurrection by the hand of Thomas XenakisGATHERING

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

The Christian faith is one that does not pretend things aren’t bad. This is a faith that does not offer platitudes to those who lost children this week to suicide or a tornado. This is not a faith that produces optimism. It is a faith that produces a defiant hope that God is still writing the story and that despite darkness a light shines and that God can redeem our crap and that beauty matters and that despite every disappointing thing we have ever done or that we have ever endured, that there is no hell from which resurrection is impossible.

Nadia Bolz-Weber, “Sermon on Why Hope and Vapid Optimism Are Not The Same Thing,” May 28, 2013 at https://www.patheos.com/blogs/nadiabolzweber/2013/05/sermon-on-why-hope-and-vapid-optimism-are-not-the-same-thing/ 

2020 Maundy Thursday online

click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Maundy Thursday Liturgy WELCOME AND INVITATION CALL TO WORSHIP Leader: Are you prepared to come to the feast of Jesus, the Christ, whose life was poured out for you? People: By the grace of God, we are. Leader: Are you able…

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