Liturgies

Our inclusive language liturgies generally set the structure and theme of Sunday morning worship. Since announcements are an integral part of our life together, we offer some guidelines for those who make announcements towards the end of  worship.

Lent 2020: Ash Wednesday

REFLECTION Wisdom marks our foreheads with ashes           as we begin the journey through Lent. She intuits what these forty days may hold in store for us          and tries to prepare us. Remembering Jesus’ forty days in the wilderness,           she knows the trials, temptations,           and vulnerability one…

2020 Epiphany : The Wholeness of What Is to Come

The altar with an anchor, shiny blue cloth, and communion cupsGATHERING

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

Genuine spirituality is not an individual pursuit, but must be anchored in one’s local community.… This means a constant struggle between freedom and obedience, listening and asserting oneself, possessing and letting go, clinging to stability and embracing change. Each individual rightfully seeks the freedom to develop God-given talents, but any selfish or narcissistic leanings are bruised in the give-and-take of community life.

Kathleen Norris, Foreword to Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict,
by Esther de Waal, The Liturgical Press: Collegeville, MN, p. 8

 

 

 

Christmastide 2020

The Christmastide altar with tinsel stars, and many, many candles and red and gold ornamentsGATHERING

ENTRANCE

 REFLECTION

Love came down at Christmas, Love all lovely, Love divine;

Love was born at Christmas; star and angels gave the sign.

Worship we the Godhead, love incarnate, love divine;

Worship we our Jesus, but wherewith for sacred sign?

Love shall be our token; love be yours and love be mine,

Love to God and neighbor, love for plea and gift and sign.

                                                                                                                                                                                                          Christina Rossetti    

2019 Advent liturgy: “What do you hear? What do you see?”

The wooden altar table holds four dark blue tapers surrounding a large white pillar candle on a dark velvelt cloth with an unruly bundle of starry wire serving as the Advent "wreath"GATHERING

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

Our God is an expert at dealing with chaos, with brokenness, with all the worst that we can imagine. God created order out of disorder, cosmos out of chaos, and God can do so always, can do so now―in our personal lives and in our lives as nations, globally. … Indeed, God is transforming the world now―through us―because God loves us.

― Desmond Tutu, from the introduction to God Has a Dream: A Vision of Hope for Our Time

 

2019 Jubilee liturgy: “The vision is out there …”

All Saints/Day of the Dead altar installationGATHERING

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

The Gospel will be performed where two or three are gathered together, listening for the Word of God, feeling the breath of the Spirit dancing in and among and through them, feeding one another so that they can become what they already are: members of the Body of Christ, going out to perform the Good News of God’s love for the healing of the world.

Deborah Sokolove, Performing the Gospel, p. 171