Sermons

Seekers recognizes that any member of the community may be called upon by God to give us the Word. Our Guidelines for Preaching help us prepare sermons. This section collects for study and reflection drafts of sermons that happen to have been prepared in electronic form. The most recent sermon is on the top of the page.

“Me Too” by Deborah Sokolove

single candle in child's clay holder elevated above altar table, draped in burlapFebruary 11, 2018

Transfiguration Sunday

Today we read the story that is usually referred to as the Transfiguration of Jesus. What does it mean to be transfigured? A quick check of the online etymology dictionary  https://www.etymonline.com/word/transfigure tells us that it comes from Latin transfigurare “to change the shape of.” It is derived from the familiar prefix trans, meaning “across” or “beyond” plus the verb figurare “to form or fashion.” To transfigure, then, is to change something or someone beyond what it was into something new and better.

A Sermon on Gratitude by Larry Rawlings

February 4, 2018single candle in child's clay holder elevated above altar table, draped in burlap

Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany

Larry spoke about changes in his life, honesty, and doing the next, right thing. Retelling the Gospel reading about Jesus healing Peter’s mother-in-law, he said that all of us more readily think about God when we are in need than simply being grateful all the time. So often we look in the wrong places for happiness and salvation from our troubles. Christians should know better, he said. Jesus tells us to go out and live in service and in peace, and to thank God for our very lives.

 

“Naked Lunch” by John Morris

January 28, 2018single candle in child's clay holder elevated above altar table, draped in burlap

Fourth Sunday after the Epiphany

My sermon this morning is about metanoia, a sudden moment of waking up after which we can never see the world in the same way.  I’m going to use the passage from 1st Corinthians as a jumping-off place to think about this.  And since Paul in this reading has also invited us to think about the meaning of what we eat, I’m going to go ahead and do that too.

Metanoia is a Greek word that means “change of mind.”  It shows up fairly often in the New Testament, and is usually translated as “repentance.”  In Luke, for instance, when Jesus says, “It is not those who are well who need the doctor, but the sick.  I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance,” the word for repentance is metanoia.  So how does “change of mind” become “repentance”?

Bokamoso 2018

single candle in child's clay holder elevated above altar table, draped in burlapJanuary 21, 2018

Third Sunday after Epiphany

Today the young people from Bokamoso again joined us, bringing us songs and stories from their lives in Winterveld, South Africa.

There is no text, but only our joyous memories of their visit, our anticipation of their return next year, and this recording of portions of the service in which they participated.

“Here I Am” by Sandra Miller

January 14, 2018single candle in child's clay holder elevated above altar table, draped in burlap

Second Sunday after the Epiphany

Kate Cudlipp and I shared the practice of beginning our sermons with a portion from Psalm 19, and by continuing the practice I like to think that Kate is whispering over my shoulder, I am here, and her gift to us of “we’re all in this together.” So I pray:

Let the words of my mouth
and the meditation of my heart
find favor in your Heart
O my Beloved, my strength and
my joy!
Amen

A side note before I begin. There is a fair amount of reference to God as He, but only in quoted passages. Personally, I have no image for God beyond a poor attempt to describe the Holy One as the Great Mystery beyond my comprehension.

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